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I realize it’s been a long time since I’ve posted anything even remotely resembling a “Gun Chick Thang”… There has just been too little time. But then I read the news about the Supreme Court’s ruling.

What’s incredibly funny to me – and sad – is that this is actually a major decision from the US Supreme Court, essentially providing a definitive interpretation of the Second Amendment as applying to the individual’s right (as do all the other amendments which address rights of citizens, and restrictions of government) but it has received relatively little in the way of coverage – it made headlines only briefly.

And supporters of this right are cheering, albeit somewhat reservedly. Since the Supreme Court is an appointed body, it’s entirely possible this whole thing will simply be overturned at some future date. So don’t expect a ticker-tape parade.

What makes me sad about this decision is that, unlike other political hot potato decisions, it came with little fanfare, and very little press coverage. A short AP blurb is about all we got. And a quick surf through major news sites found this little gem buried on most of them.

Let’s be honest here, if making it illegal for any citizen to own a handgun made cities safer, then cities like DC (with its former laws prohibiting handgun ownership), Chicago and others with similar laws, should have minimal violent crime, and zero handgun related crime. Is that the case? Oh come on! We all know it isn’t! I’m sure every criminal, law breaker, outlaw, bad guy or whatever you choose to call them, is mindfully aware of the gun bans in these cities, and carefully chooses some other weapon when they decide to go perpetrating their crimes against the unarmed populace. Yeah. Right.

Meanwhile, thinking about this made me flash back to the first night in our new house in Arizona. As we were unpacking, there was a knock on the door – a neighbor had seen the lights in the home, and knowing it had been vacant for a long time, came over to investigate. He wanted to make sure all was OK, that nothing bad was happening, and if all was good, welcome the new neighbors. Mighty nice of him, wouldn’t you say?

I would. And I was impressed with several things that night. First, the idea that the neighbors kept a close enough eye on the house, and cared enough, for someone to come investigate an unusual event was surprising to me. I was used to neighbors who pretty much ignored each other.

Second, he had a cell phone in hand and a 1911 on his hip, sitting unobtrusively in its holster (I only noticed it because, well, I’m me and I notice those things). He was smiling and pleasant and nice, but he was ready to deal with any problems that might have come up. After the initial (and very brief) moment of shock – hey, even I’m not used to seeing someone casually carrying, I’m from California, remember? – I thought, “how cool.” In this situation, had he been a “bad guy”, he would try to conceal his armament, to look innocent until he had me lulled into a sense of complacency and comfort. Instead, it was casually obvious that, as nice as he may have been, he could and would get very unpleasant should the need arise. And I was comforted by that knowledge.

I’ve since discovered that most of my neighbors are the same way, and ours is a very safe neighborhood, with zero problems of break ins or robberies, and no violent crimes or vehicle theft either.

And all I can say to that is: Hooray for the armed citizen!